”Every one should learn how to code a computer, because it’s teach you how to think”
Steve Jobs
TESTIMONIAL

Daniel

Student: Hello, my name is Daniel and I go to Field End Junior school.

Alex: Okay, what was your favorite thing about the coding club so far?

Daniel: Is the coding building artwork

Alex: Would you go and learn any other coding languages?

Daniel: yes, website creation


Alex: Okay. Would you like to sign up to the Intermediate Course next term?

Daniel: Yes!

Alex: what sort of things would you like to learn there?

Daniel: I don’t’ know

Alex: What sort of things would you hope to learn there?

Daniel: To how to do apps and all different types of games.

 

Alex: When you leave school what industry do you want to into?

Daniel: I'm not sure.

Alex: What are your future dreams and goals?

Daniel: Coding apps and games.

Alex: Anything else?

Daniel: No.

TESTIMONIAL

Neel

Student: Hello, my name is Neel and I go to Field End Junior school.

Alex: Okay. What was your favorite thing about the coding club so far?

Neel: Learning new different commands and typing out really long codes.

 


Alex: would you go and learn any other coding languages?

Neel: Yes! java script, java, how to use a language in different way.

Alex: Okay. Would you sign up to the Intermediate Course next term?

Neel: Definitely!

Alex: What sort of things would you like to learn there?

Neel: I hope to learn how to make new games, program robots

Alex: When you leave school what industry do you want to into?

Neel: I am not that sure.

Alex: What do you want to do when you get older?

Neel: programmer / engineer

Case Studies
November 12, 2017

Why every child should learn to code

Next week my daughters turn five. They are growing up in a radically different world to the one I knew when I was a kid. I was one of the generation inspired by the first wave of home computers: I taught myself to program on a ZX81, then a BBC Micro. Those early computers were glacially slow, had almost no storage and you had to write code to get them to do even the simplest task.

Today, I have a computer in my pocket that is more than 100,000 times faster and has 10,000,000 times more memory than a ZX81. It is connected to every other computer on the planet and can access virtually every piece of human knowledge ever created, nearly instantaneously. The pace of change in computing is extraordinary.

Read more

October 2, 2017

Digital literacy in the classroom. How important is it?

The digital world offers tremendous benefits to us all. It provides platforms that allow us to connect and collaborate. It opens up opportunities to learn about new and important issues, and it empowers innovation in ways that were unimaginable just a few years ago.

Today, the advancement of technology has permeated every aspect of our lives. Employers expect their workforce to have the skills needed to live, work, and thrive in a digital society. So, when preparing pupils for the world of work, digital literacy is essential. But what exactly is it?

Read more

July 22, 2017

Kids should code: why 'computational thinking' needs to be taught in schools

On Wednesday lunchtimes at Altona Primary, it’s not just the basketball court or the cricket pitch which is the place for students to be. It’s the library, where kids in grades four, five and six crowd around and enthusiastically learn the basics of how to give instructions to a computer – coding.

The students attend not only because they enjoy designing video games, and building robots and their own computers, but because they know how important these skills are for their future. As a nine-year-old explained to one of us, he was learning coding not because he wanted to be a computer scientist, but because he wanted to be an architect.

Read more

March 21, 2017

Should kids learn to code?

Behind the sliding glass door of Makers Academy in Shoreditch, east London, one afternoon in early October, an inhouse yoga teacher was leading a group of casually dressed young men and women in an afternoon meditation. With its ping-pong table, hammock and stash of Nerf guns, Makers looks like every digital startup cliche. But it is a coding bootcamp, where adults who want to change careers pay £8,000 for a three-month crash course that promises to equip them for jobs in a digital world. Only half-joking, many refer to it as “Oxbridge meets the Royal Marines for developers”.

Read more

How to make coding part of your school DNA

TESTIMONIAL

Katie

Hi, my name is Katie and I go to Field End Junior school.

Alex: Okay, Katie. What was your favorite thing about the coding club?

Katie: I don’t really know just the fact that there is always something new every week.

Alex: Would you go and learn any other coding languages?

Katie: you mean like the next level up rom basic?

Alex: Yes! Like python or Java?

Katie: Yes!

Alex: What is in your curriculum at school? What sort of IT languages do you learn at school?

Katie: at the moment we are making websites in Wordpress

Alex: Okay, Would you sign up to the Intermediate Course next term?

Katie: yes

Alex: what sort of things would you like to learn there?

Katie: not like a paint game but a complex game. My dad said I have to make him a millionaire from making a game

Alex: what do you want to do when you get older?

Katie: I love computers very much so I really want to work with computers, I don’t know make video games

Alex: what sort of video games

Katie: I don’t know kind of like complicated ones not like slither.io

Alex: so what like racing games

Katie: Yes something like that I have made something like that already on scratch

FAQs

Do I need to bring my own laptop for the course?

No. We will be using the ICT suite at the school premises. However, if you want to continue coding at home we will provide a guide so you can install the programme (Mac, Windows, Linux), which is a free download, so you can practice what you learn.

What are the class sizes?

We run our scheduled courses (during term-time) with at least 20 students in each class.

Do you offer more advanced courses?

. We are starting Intermediate courses in January 2018.  For any student that completes our Beginners course, we will save a place on the Intermediate class, however we want our students to feel confident they know the basics, so repeat Beginner classes are also available. Contact us to discuss further.

 

Will I receive a report on my Child’s progress?

  1. This can be arranged – please inform us by email if you would like a summarised report at the end of the term. Our passion for technology and coding is what motivates us to run these sessions. We work hard to make sure the Coding Club is fun and engaging for our Students.

Do you offer courses in other programming languages?

We believe that our Coding Club is not just about learning how to programme. The course provides students with the skill of learning how to think in a computational way. Once the student has grasped the basics, it is relatively easy to switch to other languages.

The emphasis is really on strengthening confidence, logical thinking and problem solving skills.

 

Where are the courses held?

Our scheduled courses are held in the school premises during term-time. We also hold Coding Clubs during the school holiday’s, which take place at Commun-IT, 214 Whitby Road, Ruislip, HA4 9DY

What about safeguarding?

All our trainers have a DBS (formerly CRB) certificate. During our scheduled courses, we also abide by School policies and where relevant we will communicate directly with Parents / Guardians and the School ICT Coordinator. If there are any changes to your normal pick-up schedule, please inform us immediately by calling <> or email <>.

 

Can I get a refund?

 We do not offer an immediate refund. Please contact us if you have any concerns once your child has started the Coding Club.

How to make coding part of your school DNA

Coding Club

Commun-IT Place
214 Whitby Road
Ruislip, Middlesex
HA4 9DY

About

"Coding isn't just for computer whizzes, it's for everyone. So they can do more than just use new tech toys but also create them."

Mitch Resnick of MIT Media Lab

Contact

0 333 4444 22 7

Social Connect